June 2017 Wine Alliance

Wines that make you say Yum!

Each month when considering the wine club selections I try to work with a theme. Last month we did mono-variety whites. This month’s plan was a celebration of rosé and sunshine but I got sidelined when I tasted the La Baronne reds. They were so charming I couldn’t resist grabbing them for you. So, a new theme…Wines that make you say Yum! It should be enough to drink a wine because it’s just really delicious. For the record I did find a great rosé for you too.

What makes a wine delicious? A well situated and farmed vineyard, ripe fruit and a great winemaker certainly are big contributors, but there is also you. Without you and your personal sense of smell and taste, a wine’s purpose, to be enjoyed, would be unrealized. I bet you never imagined wine drinking was such a big responsibility!  

To maximize your deliciousness quotient you’ll want to engage your senses. Funnily your nose is more important to perception of taste than your tongue. The olfactory system is packed with flavor sensitive nerves and the aromas deliver the message to the system. It is through your sense of smell that the subtleties of wine become apparent. If you don’t do it already, try to make swirling a habit when drinking wine as it releases those important aromas.

Taste buds-remember them? Sour, sweet, bitter, salty and umami.  Your sensitivity to those basics will have a big impact on the style of wines you like. For example, if you like sour and tart things you’ll probably like high acid wines. Although taste buds don’t actually do a lot of tasting, they are put to work distinguishing texture and balance i.e. mouth feel.      

Everyday Club

2013 La Baronne Les Lanes Rouge, Corbières, FR $19

Grapes – Grenache, Carignan

Fun Fact – Although not as old as the vines in the Pièce de Roche, the vineyard ages here are nothing to shake a stick at. The Grenache was planted in 1955 and the Carignan in 1975.The yield for this site is 28 hectoliters to the hectare*.

2016 Gobelsberg Cistercien Rosé, Kamptal, AT $17

Grapes – Zweigelt, St. Laurent, Pinot Noir

Fun Fact – Established in 1171 Gobelsburg is one of the oldest wineries in Austria. Monks tended these vineyard for ages and after an annual trip to Burgundy brought vines of Pinot Noir back home with them.

 

Focus Club

2013 La Baronne Pièce de Roche, IGP Aude-Hauterive, FR $42

Grape – Carignan

Fun Fact – This wine comes from a vineyard that was planted in 1892. As vines get really old they produce fruit with great concentration of flavors but in very little quantity. Here the yield is just 19 hectoliters to the hectare*.

2016 Gobelsberg Cistercien Rosé, Kamptal, AT      MAGNUM! $32

Grapes – Zweigelt, St. Laurent, Pinot Noir

Fun Fact – Established in 1171 Gobelsburg is one of the oldest wineries in Austria. Monks tended these vineyard for ages and after an annual trip to Burgundy brought vines of Pinot Noir back home with them.

Terms

Hectoliter to the Hectare – H/H is the European measure of how much juice comes from a vineyard.  A hectoliter is 100 liters. A hectare is 10,000 square meters. In the U.S. we say tons per acre. In general, the lower the yield the higher the concentration and quality of a wine. Be aware H/H truly makes sense in combination with vine density but even without it’s a good jumping off point for understanding why folks think it’s an important measure.